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Chemwatch australian msds 6092-93

TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 1 of 20
Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION
PRODUCT NAME
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
PROPER SHIPPING NAME
ADHESIVES
PRODUCT USE
Sprayable contact adhesive.
SUPPLIER
Company: The Laminex Group
Address:
90- 94 Tram Road
Doncaster
VIC, 3108
Australia
Telephone: +61 3 9848 4811
Emergency Tel:1800 039 008
Fax: +61 3 9840 6513
Website: www.thelaminexgroup.com.au
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE
HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. DANGEROUS GOODS. According to the Criteria of NOHSC, and the ADG
Code.

CHEMWATCH HAZARD RATINGS
RISK
Risk Codes
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 2 of 20
Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
• Harmful: danger of serious damage to health by prolongedexposure through inhalation.
• Harmful to aquatic organisms, may cause long- term adverseeffects in the aquatic environment.
• Possible risk of harm to the unborn child.
• HARMFUL- May cause lung damage if swallowed.
• Repeated exposure may cause skin dryness and cracking.
• Vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness.
SAFETY
Safety Codes
• Keep away from sources of ignition. No smoking.
• Do not breathe gas/fumes/vapour/spray.
• Wear suitable protective clothing.
• Use only in well ventilated areas.
• Keep container in a well ventilated place.
• Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.
• To clean the floor and all objects contaminated by this material, use waterand detergent.
• Keep away from food, drink and animal feeding stuffs.
• In case of contact with eyes, rinse with plenty of water and contact Doctor orPoisons Information Centre.
• If swallowed, IMMEDIATELY contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre. (showthis container or label).
• This material and its container must be disposed of as hazardous waste.
Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
SWALLOWED
■ - For advice, contact a Poisons Information Centre or a doctor.
■ - If swallowed do NOT induce vomiting.
- If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on left side (head-down position, if possible) to
maintain open airway and prevent aspiration.
- Observe the patient carefully.
- Never give liquid to a person showing signs of being sleepy or with reduced awareness; i.e. becoming
unconscious.
- Give water to rinse out mouth, then provide liquid slowly and as much as casualty can comfortably drink.
- Seek medical advice.
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 3 of 20
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
■ - Avoid giving milk or oils.
■ - Avoid giving alcohol.
EYE
■ If this product comes in contact with the eyes:
- Immediately hold eyelids apart and flush the eye continuously with running water.
- Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by
occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
- Continue flushing until advised to stop by the Poisons Information Centre or a doctor, or for at least 15
minutes.
- Transport to hospital or doctor without delay.
- Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.
SKIN
■ If skin contact occurs:
- Immediately remove all contaminated clothing, including footwear.
- Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
- Seek medical attention in event of irritation.
INHALED
■ - If fumes or combustion products are inhaled remove from contaminated area.
- Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
- Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to
initiating first aid procedures.
- Apply artificial respiration if not breathing, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask
device, or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
- Transport to hospital, or doctor.
NOTES TO PHYSICIAN
■ Treat symptomatically.
For acute or short term repeated exposures to acetone:
- Symptoms of acetone exposure approximate ethanol intoxication.
- About 20% is expired by the lungs and the rest is metabolised. Alveolar air half-life is about 4 hours
following two hour inhalation at levels near the Exposure Standard; in overdose, saturable metabolism and
limited clearance, prolong the elimination half-life to 25-30 hours.
- There are no known antidotes and treatment should involve the usual methods of decontamination followed by
supportive care. [Ellenhorn and Barceloux: Medical Toxicology]
Management:
Measurement of serum and urine acetone concentrations may be useful to monitor the severity of ingestion or
inhalation.
Inhalation Management:
- Maintain a clear airway, give humidified oxygen and ventilate if necessary.
- If respiratory irritation occurs, assess respiratory function and, if necessary, perform chest X-rays to
check for chemical pneumonitis.
- Consider the use of steroids to reduce the inflammatory response.
- Treat pulmonary oedema with PEEP or CPAP ventilation.
Dermal Management:
- Remove any remaining contaminated clothing, place in double sealed, clear bags, label and store in secure
area away from patients and staff.
- Irrigate with copious amounts of water.
- An emollient may be required.
Eye Management:
- Irrigate thoroughly with running water or saline for 15 minutes.
- Stain with fluorescein and refer to an ophthalmologist if there is any uptake of the stain.
Oral Management:
- No GASTRIC LAVAGE OR EMETIC
-
Systemic Management:- Monitor blood glucose and arterial pH.
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 4 of 20
Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES
- Ventilate if respiratory depression occurs.
- If patient unconscious, monitor renal function.
- Symptomatic and supportive care.
The Chemical Incident Management Handbook:Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospital Trust, 2000 These represent the determinants observed in specimens collected from a healthy worker exposed at theExposure Standard (ES or TLV):Determinant NS: Non-specific determinant; also observed after exposure to other material.
Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
EXTINGUISHING MEDIA
■ Do not use a water jet to fight fire.
FIRE FIGHTING
■ - Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
- May be violently or explosively reactive.
- Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
- Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
- Consider evacuation (or protect in place).
- Fight fire from a safe distance, with adequate cover.
- If safe, switch off electrical equipment until vapour fire hazard removed.
- Use water delivered as a fine spray to control the fire and cool adjacent area.
- Avoid spraying water onto liquid pools.
- Do not approach containers suspected to be hot.
- Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
- If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
When any large container (including road and rail tankers) is involved in a fire,
consider evacuation by 500 metres in all directions.
FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD
■ - Liquid and vapour are highly flammable.
- Severe fire hazard when exposed to heat, flame and/or oxidisers.
- Vapour may travel a considerable distance to source of ignition.
- Heating may cause expansion or decomposition leading to violent rupture of containers.
- On combustion, may emit toxic fumes of carbon monoxide (CO).
Combustion products include: carbon dioxide (CO2), other pyrolysis products typical of burning organic
material.
Contains low boiling substance: Closed containers may rupture due to pressure buildup under fire conditions.
FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY
■ - Avoid contamination with oxidising agents i.e. nitrates, oxidising acids, chlorine bleaches, pool
chlorine etc. as ignition may result.
HAZCHEM
•3YE
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
MINOR SPILLS
■ - Remove all ignition sources.
- Clean up all spills immediately.
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 5 of 20
Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
- Avoid breathing vapours and contact with skin and eyes.
- Control personal contact by using protective equipment.
- Contain and absorb small quantities with vermiculite or other absorbent material.
- Wipe up.
- Collect residues in a flammable waste container.
MAJOR SPILLS
■ - Clear area of personnel and move upwind.
- Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
- May be violently or explosively reactive.
- Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
- Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
- Consider evacuation (or protect in place).
- No smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
- Increase ventilation.
- Stop leak if safe to do so.
- Water spray or fog may be used to disperse /absorb vapour.
- Contain spill with sand, earth or vermiculite.
- Use only spark-free shovels and explosion proof equipment.
- Collect recoverable product into labelled containers for recycling.
- Absorb remaining product with sand, earth or vermiculite.
- Collect solid residues and seal in labelled drums for disposal.
- Wash area and prevent runoff into drains.
- If contamination of drains or waterways occurs, advise emergency services.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING GUIDELINES (ERPG)
The maximum airborne concentration below which it is believed that nearly all individuals could be exposed
for up to one hour WITHOUT experiencing or developing
irreversible or other serious effects or symptoms which could impair an individual's ability to take other than mild, transient adverse effects without perceiving a clearly defined odour is: American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Ingredients considered according to the following cutoffs where percentage is percentage of ingredient found in the mixture Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING
■ - DO NOT allow clothing wet with material to stay in contact with skin.
- Avoid all personal contact, including inhalation.
- Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 6 of 20
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
- Use in a well-ventilated area.
- Prevent concentration in hollows and sumps.
- DO NOT enter confined spaces until atmosphere has been checked.
- Avoid smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
- When handling, DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
- Vapour may ignite on pumping or pouring due to static electricity.
- DO NOT use plastic buckets.
- Earth and secure metal containers when dispensing or pouring product.
- Use spark-free tools when handling.
- Avoid contact with incompatible materials.
- Keep containers securely sealed.
- Avoid physical damage to containers.
- Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
- Work clothes should be laundered separately.
- Use good occupational work practice.
- Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
- Atmosphere should be regularly checked against established exposure standards to ensure safe working conditions.
Contains low boiling substance:Storage in sealed containers may result in pressure buildup causing violent rupture of containers not rated appropriately.
- Check for bulging containers.
- Vent periodically- Always release caps or seals slowly to ensure slow dissipation of vapours.
- Containers, even those that have been emptied, may contain explosive vapours.
- Do NOT cut, drill, grind, weld or perform similar operations on or near containers.
SUITABLE CONTAINER
■ - Packing as supplied by manufacturer.
- Plastic containers may only be used if approved for flammable liquid.
- Check that containers are clearly labelled and free from leaks.
- For low viscosity materials (i) : Drums and jerry cans must be of the non-removable head type. (ii) : Where
a can is to be used as an inner package, the can must have a screwed enclosure.
- For materials with a viscosity of at least 2680 cSt. (23 deg. C)
- For manufactured product having a viscosity of at least 250 cSt. (23 deg. C)
- Manufactured product that requires stirring before use and having a viscosity of at least 20 cSt (25 deg. C)
(i) : Removable head packaging;
(ii) : Cans with friction closures and
(iii) : low pressure tubes and cartridges may be used.
- Where combination packages are used, and the inner packages are of glass, there must be sufficient inert
cushioning material in contact with inner and outer packages
- In addition, where inner packagings are glass and contain liquids of packing group I there must be
sufficient inert absorbent to absorb any spillage, unless the outer packaging is a close fitting moulded
plastic box and the substances are not incompatible with the plastic.
STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY
■ Acetone:
- may react violently with chloroform, activated charcoal, aliphatic amines, bromine, bromine trifluoride,
chlorotriazine, chromic(IV) acid, chromic(VI) acid, chromium trioxide, chromyl chloride, hexachloromelamine,
iodine heptafluoride, iodoform, liquid oxygen, nitrosyl chloride, nitrosyl perchlorate, nitryl perchlorate,
perchloromelamine, peroxomonosulfuric acid, platinum, potassium tert-butoxide, strong acids, sulfur
dichloride, trichloromelamine, xenon tetrafluoride
- reacts violently with bromoform and chloroform in the presence of alkalies or in contact with alkaline
surfaces.
- may form unstable and explosive peroxides in contact with strong oxidisers, fluorine, hydrogen peroxide
(90%), sodium perchlorate, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene
- can increase the explosive sensitivity of nitromethane on contact flow or agitation may generate
electrostatic charges due to low conductivity
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 7 of 20
Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE
- dissolves or attacks most rubber, resins, and plastics (polyethylenes, polyester, vinyl ester, PVC, Neoprene, Viton).
- Avoid reaction with oxidising agents.
STORAGE REQUIREMENTS
■ - Store in original containers in approved flame-proof area.
- No smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
- DO NOT store in pits, depressions, basements or areas where vapours may be trapped.
- Keep containers securely sealed.
- Store away from incompatible materials in a cool, dry well ventilated area.
- Protect containers against physical damage and check regularly for leaks.
- Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
EXPOSURE CONTROLS
Source
EMERGENCY EXPOSURE LIMITS
Material
NOTESValues marked LEL indicate that the IDLH was based on 10% of the lower explosive limit for safetyconsiderations even though the relevant toxicological data indicated that irreversible health effects orimpairment of escape existed only at higher concentrations.
MATERIAL DATA
N-HEXANE:
TOLUENE:
■ Exposure limits with "skin" notation indicate that vapour and liquid may be absorbed through intact skin. Absorption by skin may readily exceed vapour inhalation exposure. Symptoms for skin absorption are thesame as for inhalation. Contact with eyes and mucous membranes may also contribute to overall exposure andmay also invalidate the exposure standard.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE: ■ Sensory irritants are chemicals that produce temporary and undesirable side-effects on the eyes, nose or throat. Historically occupational exposure standards for these irritants have been based on observation ofworkers' responses to various airborne concentrations. Present day expectations require that nearly everyindividual should be protected against even minor sensory irritation and exposure standards are establishedusing uncertainty factors or safety factors of 5 to 10 or more. On occasion animal no-observable-effect-levels (NOEL) are used to determine these limits where human results are unavailable. An additional approach,typically used by the TLV committee (USA) in determining respiratory standards for this group of chemicals,has been to assign ceiling values (TLV C) to rapidly acting irritants and to assign short-term exposurelimits (TLV STELs) when the weight of evidence from irritation, bioaccumulation and other endpoints combine continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 8 of 20
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
to warrant such a limit. In contrast the MAK Commission (Germany) uses a five-category system based onintensive odour, local irritation, and elimination half-life. However this system is being replaced to beconsistent with the European Union (EU) Scientific Committee for Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL); thisis more closely allied to that of the USA.
OSHA (USA) concluded that exposure to sensory irritants can:- cause inflammation- cause increased susceptibility to other irritants and infectious agents- lead to permanent injury or dysfunction- permit greater absorption of hazardous substances and- acclimate the worker to the irritant warning properties of these substances thus increasing the risk of ■ Odour Threshold Value: 3.6 ppm (detection), 699 ppm (recognition)Saturation vapour concentration: 237000 ppm @ 20 CNOTE: Detector tubes measuring in excess of 40 ppm, are available.
Exposure at or below the recommended TLV-TWA is thought to protect the worker against mild irritation associated with brief exposures and the bioaccumulation, chronic irritation of the respiratory tract andheadaches associated with long-term acetone exposures. The NIOSH REL-TWA is substantially lower and has takeninto account slight irritation experienced by volunteer subjects at 300 ppm. Mild irritation to acclimatisedworkers begins at about 750 ppm - unacclimatised subjects will experience irritation at about 350-500 ppm butacclimatisation can occur rapidly. Disagreement between the peak bodies is based largely on the view by ACGIHthat widespread use of acetone, without evidence of significant adverse health effects at higherconcentrations, allows acceptance of a higher limit.
Half-life of acetone in blood is 3 hours which means that no adjustment for shift-length has to be made with reference to the standard 8 hour/day, 40 hours per week because body clearance occurs within any shiftwith low potential for accumulation.
A STEL has been established to prevent excursions of acetone vapours that could cause depression of the Odour Safety Factor(OSF)OSF=38 (ACETONE).
Exposed individuals are reasonably expected to be warned, by smell, that the Exposure Standard is being Odour Safety Factor (OSF) is determined to fall into either Class A or B.
The Odour Safety Factor (OSF) is defined as:OSF= Exposure Standard (TWA) ppm/ Odour Threshold Value (OTV) ppmClassification into classes follows: Over 90% of exposed individualsare aware by smell that theExposure Standard (TLV- TWA forexample) is being reached, evenwhen distracted by workingactivities As " A" for 50- 90% of personsbeing distracted As " A" for less than 50% ofpersons being distracted 10- 50% of persons aware ofbeing tested perceive by smellthat the Exposure Standard isbeing reached As " D" for less than 10% ofpersons aware of being tested continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 9 of 20
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
■ For toluene:Odour Threshold Value: 0.16-6.7 (detection), 1.9-69 (recognition)NOTE: Detector tubes measuring in excess of 5 ppm, are available.
High concentrations of toluene in the air produce depression of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans. Intentional toluene exposure (glue-sniffing) at maternally-intoxicating concentration has alsoproduced birth defects. Foetotoxicity appears at levels associated with CNS narcosis and probably occurs onlyin those with chronic toluene-induced kidney failure. Exposure at or below the recommended TLV-TWA is thoughtto prevent transient headache and irritation, to provide a measure of safety for possible disturbances tohuman reproduction, the prevention of reductions in cognitive responses reported amongst humans inhalinggreater than 40 ppm, and the significant risks of hepatotoxic, behavioural and nervous system effects(including impaired reaction time and incoordination). Although toluene/ethanol interactions are wellrecognised, the degree of protection afforded by the TLV-TWA among drinkers is not known.
Odour Safety Factor(OSF)OSF=17 (TOLUENE).
■ For n-hexane:Odour Threshold Value: 65 ppmNOTE: Detector tubes for n-hexane, measuring in excess of 100 ppm, are available commercially.
Occupational polyneuropathy may result from exposures as low as 500 ppm (as hexane), whilst nearly continuous exposures of 250 ppm have caused neurotoxic effects in animals. Many literature reports havefailed to distinguish hexane from n-hexane and on the assumption that the commercial hexane contains 30% n-hexane, a worst case recommendation for TLV is assumed to reduce the risk of peripheral neuropathies (due tothe metabolites 2,5-heptanedione and 3,6-octanedione) and other adverse neuropathic effects.
Concurrent exposure to chemicals (including MEK) and drugs which induce hepatic liver oxidative metabolism can reduce the time for neuropathy to appear.
Odour Safety Factor(OSF)OSF=0.15 (n-HEXANE).
PERSONAL PROTECTION
EYE
■ - Safety glasses with side shields.
- Chemical goggles.
- Contact lenses may pose a special hazard; soft contact lenses may absorb and concentrate irritants. A
written policy document, describing the wearing of lens or restrictions on use, should be created for each
workplace or task. This should include a review of lens absorption and adsorption for the class of chemicals
in use and an account of injury experience. Medical and first-aid personnel should be trained in their
removal and suitable equipment should be readily available. In the event of chemical exposure, begin eye
irrigation immediately and remove contact lens as soon as practicable. Lens should be removed at the first
signs of eye redness or irritation - lens should be removed in a clean environment only after workers have
washed hands thoroughly. [CDC NIOSH Current Intelligence Bulletin 59], [AS/NZS 1336 or national equivalent].
HANDS/FEET
■ Suitability and durability of glove type is dependent on usage. Important factors in the selection of
gloves include:
- frequency and duration of contact,
- chemical resistance of glove material,
- glove thickness and
- dexterity
Select gloves tested to a relevant standard (e.g. Europe EN 374, US F739, AS/NZS 2161.1 or national
equivalent).
- When prolonged or frequently repeated contact may occur, a glove with a protection class of 5 or higher
(breakthrough time greater than 240 minutes according to EN 374, AS/NZS 2161.10.1 or national equivalent) is
recommended.
- When only brief contact is expected, a glove with a protection class of 3 or higher (breakthrough time
greater than 60 minutes according to EN 374, AS/NZS 2161.10.1 or national equivalent) is recommended.
- Contaminated gloves should be replaced.
continued.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE
Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 10 of 20
Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION
Gloves must only be worn on clean hands. After using gloves, hands should be washed and dried thoroughly.
Application of a non-perfumed moisturiser is recommended.
- Wear chemical protective gloves, eg. PVC.
- Wear safety footwear or safety gumboots, eg. Rubber.
OTHER
■ - Overalls.
- PVC Apron.
- PVC protective suit may be required if exposure severe.
- Eyewash unit.
- Ensure there is ready access to a safety shower.
RESPIRATOR
•Type AX Filter of sufficient capacity. (AS/NZS 1716 & 1715, EN 143:2000 & 149:2001, ANSI Z88 or national
equivalent)
The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protectiveequipment required. For further information consult site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or yourOccupational Health and Safety Advisor.
ENGINEERING CONTROLS
■ Engineering controls are used to remove a hazard or place a barrier between the worker and the hazard. Well-
designed engineering controls can be highly effective in protecting workers and will typically be independent
of worker interactions to provide this high level of protection.
The basic types of engineering controls are:
Process controls which involve changing the way a job activity or process is done to reduce the risk.
Enclosure and/or isolation of emission source which keeps a selected hazard "physically" away from the worker
and ventilation that strategically "adds" and "removes" air in the work environment. Ventilation can remove
or dilute an air contaminant if designed properly. The design of a ventilation system must match the
particular process and chemical or contaminant in use.
Employers may need to use multiple types of controls to prevent employee overexposure.
For flammable liquids and flammable gases, local exhaust ventilation or a process enclosure ventilationsystem may be required. Ventilation equipment should be explosion-resistant.
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
APPEARANCE
Clear red highly flammable liquid with a solvent odour; does not mix with water.
PHYSICAL PROPERTIES
Liquid.
Does not mix with water.
Floats on water.
continued.
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Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 11 of 20
Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Section 10 - STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY
■ - Presence of incompatible materials.
- Product is considered stable.
- Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.
For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage.
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS
ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS
SWALLOWED
■ Accidental ingestion of the material may be harmful; animal experiments indicate that ingestion of less
than 150 gram may be fatal or may produce serious damage to the health of the individual.
Considered an unlikely route of entry in commercial/industrial environments. The liquid may produce
gastrointestinal discomfort and may be harmful if swallowed. Ingestion may result in nausea, pain and
vomiting. Vomit entering the lungs by aspiration may cause potentially lethal chemical pneumonitis.
Central nervous system (CNS) depression may include general discomfort, symptoms of giddiness, headache,
dizziness, nausea, anaesthetic effects, slowed reaction time, slurred speech and may progress to
unconsciousness. Serious poisonings may result in respiratory depression and may be fatal.
EYE
■ There is evidence that material may produce eye irritation in some persons and produce eye damage 24 hours
or more after instillation. Severe inflammation may be expected with pain. There may be damage to the cornea.
Unless treatment is prompt and adequate there may be permanent loss of vision. Conjunctivitis can occur
following repeated exposure.
The liquid produces a high level of eye discomfort and is capable of causing pain and severe conjunctivitis.
Corneal injury may develop, with possible permanent impairment of vision, if not promptly and adequately
treated.
SKIN
■ Entry into the blood-stream, through, for example, cuts, abrasions or lesions, may produce systemic injury
with harmful effects. Examine the skin prior to the use of the material and ensure that any external damage
is suitably protected.
The material may accentuate any pre-existing dermatitis condition.
The material may cause moderate inflammation of the skin either following direct contact or after a delay of
some time. Repeated exposure can cause contact dermatitis which is characterised by redness, swelling and
blistering.
INHALED
■ Inhalation of high concentrations of gas/vapour causes lung irritation with coughing and nausea, central
nervous depression with headache and dizziness, slowing of reflexes, fatigue and inco-ordination.
If exposure to highly concentrated solvent atmosphere is prolonged this may lead to narcosis, unconsciousness,
even coma and possible death.
continued.
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Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet
Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011

CHEMWATCH 6092-93
Version No:2.0
CD 2011/4 Page 12 of 20
Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Inhalation of vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. This may be accompanied by sleepiness, reducedalertness, loss of reflexes, lack of co-ordination, and vertigo.
Ketone vapours irritate the nose, throat and mucous membrane. High concentrations depress the central nervoussystem, causing headache, vertigo, poor concentration, sleep and failure of the heart and breathing. Someketones can cause multiple nerve disorders, inducing "pins and needles" and weakness in the limbs.
Inhalation of acetone causes central nervous system depression, light-headedness, incoherent speech, inco-ordination, stupor, low blood pressure, fast pulse, metabolic acidosis, high blood sugar and ketosis. Rarely,convulsions and tubular necrosis may be evident. Other symptoms of exposure may include restlessness,headache, vomiting, low blood pressure and rapid and irregular pulse, eye and throat irritation, weakness ofthe legs and dizziness. Inhalation of high concentrations may produce dryness of the mouth and throat, nausea,inco-ordinated movement, loss of co-ordinated speech, drowsiness, and in severe cases, coma. Inhalation ofacetone vapours over long periods causes irritation of the airways, coughing and headache. Rats exposed to aconcentration of 5.22% for 1 hour showed clear signs of sleepiness; deaths occurred at 12.66%.
CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS
■ Harmful: danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure through inhalation.
Harmful: danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure through inhalation.
This material can cause serious damage if one is exposed to it for long periods. It can be assumed that it
contains a substance which can produce severe defects. This has been demonstrated via both short- and long-
term experimentation.
Based on experience with animal studies, exposure to the material may result in toxic effects to the
development of the foetus, at levels which do not cause significant toxic effects to the mother.
Workers exposed to acetone for long periods showed inflammation of the airways, stomach and small bowel,
attacks of giddiness and loss of strength. Exposure to acetone may enhance the liver toxicity of chlorinated
solvents.
Chronic solvent inhalation exposures may result in nervous system impairment and liver and blood changes.
[PATTYS].
TOXICITY AND IRRITATION
■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
TRADE ESSENTIALS - SPRAYABLE CONTACT ADHESIVE:■ Not available. Refer to individual constituents.
Inhalation (rat) LC50: 50100 mg/m³/8 hrDermal (rabbit) LD50: 20000 mg/kg■ The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce on contact skinredness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling and thickening of the skin.
for acetone:The acute toxicity of acetone is low. Acetone is not a skin irritant or sensitiser but is a defatting agentto the skin. Acetone is an eye irritant. The subchronic toxicity of acetone has been examined in mice andrats that were administered acetone in the drinking water and again in rats treated by oral gavage. Acetone-induced increases in relative kidney weight changes were observed in male and female rats used in the oral 13-week study. Acetone treatment caused increases in the relative liver weight in male and female rats that werenot associated with histopathologic effects and the effects may have been associated with microsomal enzymeinduction. Haematologic effects consistent with macrocytic anaemia were also noted in male rats along withhyperpigmentation in the spleen. The most notable findings in the mice were increased liver and decreasedspleen weights. Overall, the no-observed-effect-levels in the drinking water study were 1% for male rats (900mg/kg/d) and male mice (2258 mg/kg/d), 2% for female mice (5945 mg/kg/d), and 5% for female rats (3100mg/kg/d). For developmental effects, a statistically significant reduction in foetal weight, and a slight,but statistically significant increase in the percent incidence of later resorptions were seen in mice at 15, continued.
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Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
665 mg/m3 and in rats at 26,100 mg/m3. The no-observable-effect level for developmental toxicity wasdetermined to be 5220 mg/m3 for both rats and mice.
Teratogenic effects were not observed in rats and mice tested at 26,110 and 15,665 mg/m3, respectively.
Lifetime dermal carcinogenicity studies in mice treated with up to 0.2 mL of acetone did not reveal anyincrease in organ tumor incidence relative to untreated control animals.
The scientific literature contains many different studies that have measured either the neurobehaviouralperformance or neurophysiological response of humans exposed to acetone. Effect levels ranging from about 600to greater than 2375 mg/m3 have been reported. Neurobehavioral studies with acetone-exposed employees haverecently shown that 8-hr exposures in excess of 2375 mg/m3 were not associated with any dose-related changesin response time, vigilance, or digit span scores. Clinical case studies, controlled human volunteer studies,animal research, and occupational field evaluations all indicate that the NOAEL for this effect is 2375 mg/m3or greater.
Dermal (rabbit) LD50: 12124 mg/kg■ The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce on contact skinredness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling and thickening of the skin.
For toluene:Acute ToxicityHumans exposed to intermediate to high levels of toluene for short periods of time experience adverse centralnervous system effects ranging from headaches to intoxication, convulsions, narcosis, and death. Similareffects are observed in short-term animal studies.
Humans - Toluene ingestion or inhalation can result in severe central nervous system depression, and in largedoses, can act as a narcotic. The ingestion of about 60 mL resulted in fatal nervous system depression within30 minutes in one reported case.
Constriction and necrosis of myocardial fibers, markedly swollen liver, congestion and haemorrhage of thelungs and acute tubular necrosis were found on autopsy.
Central nervous system effects (headaches, dizziness, intoxication) and eye irritation occurred followinginhalation exposure to 100 ppm toluene 6 hours/day for 4 days.
Exposure to 600 ppm for 8 hours resulted in the same and more serious symptoms including euphoria, dilatedpupils, convulsions, and nausea . Exposure to 10,000-30,000 ppm has been reported to cause narcosis and deathToluene can also strip the skin of lipids causing dermatitisAnimals - The initial effects are instability and incoordination, lachrymation and sniffles (respiratoryexposure), followed by narcosis. Animals die of respiratory failure from severe nervous system depression.
Cloudy swelling of the kidneys was reported in rats following inhalation exposure to 1600 ppm, 18-20hours/day for 3 daysSubchronic/Chronic Effects:Repeat doses of toluene cause adverse central nervous system effects and can damage the upper respiratorysystem, the liver, and the kidney. Adverse effects occur as a result from both oral and the inhalationexposures. A reported lowest-observed-effect level in humans for adverse neurobehavioral effects is 88 ppm.
Humans - Chronic occupational exposure and incidences of toluene abuse have resulted in hepatomegaly andliver function changes. It has also resulted in nephrotoxicity and, in one case, was a cardiac sensitiser andfatal cardiotoxin.
Neural and cerebellar dystrophy were reported in several cases of habitual "glue sniffing." Anepidemiological study in France on workers chronically exposed to toluene fumes reported leukopenia andneutropenia. Exposure levels were not given in the secondary reference; however, the average urinaryexcretion of hippuric acid, a metabolite of toluene, was given as 4 g/L compared to a normal level of 0.6 g/LAnimals - The major target organs for the subchronic/chronic toxicity of toluene are the nervous system,liver, and kidney. Depressed immune response has been reported in male mice given doses of 105 mg/kg/day for28 days. Toluene in corn oil administered to F344 male and female rats by gavage 5 days/week for 13 weeks,induced prostration, hypoactivity, ataxia, piloerection, lachrymation, excess salivation, and body tremors atdoses 2500 mg/kg. Liver, kidney, and heart weights were also increased at this dose and histopathologiclesions were seen in the liver, kidneys, brain and urinary bladder. The no-observed-adverse effect level continued.
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(NOAEL) for the study was 312 mg/kg (223 mg/kg/day) and the lowest-observed-adverse effect level (LOAEL) forthe study was 625 mg/kg (446 mg/kg/day) .
Developmental/Reproductive ToxicityExposures to high levels of toluene can result in adverse effects in the developing human foetus. Severalstudies have indicated that high levels of toluene can also adversely effect the developing offspring inlaboratory animals.
Humans - Variable growth, microcephaly, CNS dysfunction, attentional deficits, minor craniofacial and limbabnormalities, and developmental delay were seen in three children exposed to toluene in utero as a result ofmaternal solvent abuse before and during pregnancyAnimals - Sternebral alterations, extra ribs, and missing tails were reported following treatment of ratswith 1500 mg/m3 toluene 24 hours/day during days 9-14 of gestation. Two of the dams died during the exposure.
Another group of rats received 1000 mg/m3 8 hours/day during days 1-21 of gestation. No maternal deaths ortoxicity occurred, however, minor skeletal retardation was present in the exposed fetuses. CFLP Mice wereexposed to 500 or 1500 mg/m3 toluene continuously during days 6-13 of pregnancy. All dams died at the highdose during the first 24 hours of exposure, however none died at 500 mg/m3. Decreased foetal weight wasreported, but there were no differences in the incidences of skeletal malformations or anomalies between thetreated and control offspring.
Absorption - Studies in humans and animals have demonstrated that toluene is readily absorbed via the lungsand the gastrointestinal tract. Absorption through the skin is estimated at about 1% of that absorbed by thelungs when exposed to toluene vapor.
Dermal absorption is expected to be higher upon exposure to the liquid; however, exposure is limited by therapid evaporation of toluene .
Distribution - In studies with mice exposed to radiolabeled toluene by inhalation, high levels ofradioactivity were present in body fat, bone marrow, spinal nerves, spinal cord, and brain white matter.
Lower levels of radioactivity were present in blood, kidney, and liver. Accumulation of toluene has generallybeen found in adipose tissue, other tissues with high fat content, and in highly vascularised tissues .
Metabolism - The metabolites of inhaled or ingested toluene include benzyl alcohol resulting from thehydroxylation of the methyl group. Further oxidation results in the formation of benzaldehyde and benzoicacid. The latter is conjugated with glycine to yield hippuric acid or reacted with glucuronic acid to formbenzoyl glucuronide. o-cresol and p-cresol formed by ring hydroxylation are considered minor metabolitesExcretion - Toluene is primarily (60-70%) excreted through the urine as hippuric acid. The excretion ofbenzoyl glucuronide accounts for 10-20%, and excretion of unchanged toluene through the lungs also accountsfor 10-20%. Excretion of hippuric acid is usually complete within 24 hours after exposure.
Inhalation (human) TCLo: 190 ppm/8WInhalation (rat) LD50: 48000 ppm/4h■ The material may be irritating to the eye, with prolonged contact causing inflammation. Repeated orprolonged exposure to irritants may produce conjunctivitis.
CARCINOGEN
Toluene
International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Agents Reviewed by the IARCMonographs REPROTOXIN
toluene
SKIN
toluene
continued.
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Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
TOLUENE:N-HEXANE:ACETONE:■ DO NOT discharge into sewer or waterways.
ACETONE:■ For Ketones: Ketones, unless they are alpha, beta--unsaturated ketones, can be considered as narcosis orbaseline toxicity compounds.
Aquatic Fate: Hydrolysis of ketones in water is thermodynamically favourable only for low molecular weightketones. Reactions with water are reversible with no permanent change in the structure of the ketonesubstrate. Ketones are stable to water under ambient environmental conditions. When pH levels are greaterthan 10, condensation reactions can occur which produce higher molecular weight products. Under ambientconditions of temperature, pH, and low concentration, these condensation reactions are unfavourable. Based onits reactions in air, it seems likely that ketones undergo photolysis in water.
Terrestrial Fate: It is probable that ketones will be biodegraded by micro-organisms in soil and water.
Ketones are unlikely to bioconcentrate or biomagnify.
For Acetone: log Kow : -0.24;Half-life (hr) air : 312-1896;Half-life (hr) H2O surface water : 20;Henry's atm m3 /mol : 3.67E-05BOD 5: 0.31-1.76,46-55%COD: 1.12-2.07ThOD: 2.2BCF: 0.69.
Environmental Fate: The relatively long half-life allows acetone to be transported long distances from itsemission source.
Atmospheric Fate: Acetone preferentially locates in the air compartment when released to the environment. Inair, acetone is lost by photolysis and reaction with photochemically produced hydroxyl radicals; theestimated half-life of these combined processes is about 22 days. Air Quality Standards: none available.
Terrestrial Fate: Very little acetone is expected to reside in soil, biota, or suspended solids and has lowpropensity for soil absorption and a high preference for moving through the soil and into the ground water.
Acetone released to soil volatilizes although some may leach into the ground where it rapidly biodegrades.
Soil Guidelines: none available.
Aquatic Fate: A substantial amount of acetone can also be found in water. Acetone is highly soluble and slightly persistent in water, with a half-life of about 20 hours Drinking Water Standard: none available.
Ecotoxicity: Acetone does not concentrate in the food chain, is minimally toxic to aquatic life and isconsidered to be readily biodegradable. Testing shows that acetone exhibits a low order of toxicity for brooktrout, fathead minnow, Japanese quail, ring-neck pheasant and water fleas. Low toxicity for aquaticinvertebrates. For aquatic plants, NOEC: 5400-7500 mg/L. Acetone vapours were shown to be relatively toxic toflour beetle and flour moths and their eggs. The direct application of acetone liquid to the body of theinsects or surface of the eggs did not, however, cause any mortality. The ability of acetone to inhibit cellmultiplication has been examined in a wide variety of microorganisms. Mild to moderate toxicity occurred inbacteria exposed to acetone for 6-4 days however, overall data indicates a low degree of toxicity foracetone. The only exception to these findings was the results obtained with the flagellated protozoa(Entosiphon sulcatum).
TOLUENE:■ For Toluene:log Kow : 2.1-3;log Koc : 1.12-2.85;Koc : 37-260;log Kom : 1.39-2.89;Half-life (hr) air : 2.4-104;Half-life (hr) H2O surface water : Half-life (hr) H2O ground : 168-2628;Half-life (hr) soil : <48-240;Henry's Pa m3 /mol : 518-694; continued.
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ThOD - 3.13 ; BCF - 1.67-380;log BCF - 0.22-3.28.
Atmospheric Fate: The majority of toluene evaporates to the atmosphere from the water and soil. The maindegradation pathway for toluene in the atmosphere is reaction with photochemically produced hydroxylradicals. The estimated atmospheric half life for toluene is about 13 hours. Toluene is also oxidized byreactions with atmospheric nitrogen dioxide, oxygen, and ozone, but these are minor degradation pathways.
Photolysis is not considered a significant degradative pathway for toluene.
Terrestrial Fate: Toluene is moderately retarded by adsorption to soils rich in organic material, therefore,transport to ground water is dependent on soil composition. In unsaturated topsoil containing organicmaterial, it has been estimated that 97% of the toluene is adsorbed to the soil and only about 2% is in thesoil-water phase and transported with flowing groundwater. There is little retardation in sandy soils and 2-13% of the toluene was estimated to migrate with flowing water; the remainder was volatilized, biodegraded,or unaccounted for. In saturated deep soils with no soil-air phase, about 48% may be transported with flowinggroundwater. In surface soil, volatilization to air is an important fate process for toluene. In theenvironment, biodegradation of toluene to carbon dioxide occurs with a typical half life of 1-7 days.
Aquatic Fate: An important fate process for toluene is volatilization, the rate of which depends on the amount of turbulence in the surface water. The volatilization of toluene from static water has a half life of1-16 days, whereas from turbulent water the half life is 5-6 hours. Degradation of toluene in surface wateroccurs primarily by biodegradation with a half life of less than one day under favorable conditions (presenceof microorganisms, microbial adaptation, and optimum temperature). Biodegradation also occurs in shallowgroundwater and in salt water (at a reduced rate). No data are available on anaerobic degradation of toluenein deep ground water conditions where aerobic degradation would be minimal.
Ecotoxicity: Bioaccumulation in the food chain is predicted to be low. Toluene has moderate acute toxicity toaquatic organisms. Toluene is, on the average, slightly toxic to fathead minnow, guppies and goldfish and notacutely toxic to bluegill or channel catfish and crab. Toluene, on the average, is slightly toxic tocrustaceans specifically, shrimp species including grass shrimp and daggerblade grass shrimp. Toluene has anegative effect on green algae during their growth phase.
N-HEXANE:■ Toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment.
Do NOT allow product to come in contact with surface waters or to intertidal areas below the mean high watermark. Do not contaminate water when cleaning equipment or disposing of equipment wash-waters.
Wastes resulting from use of the product must be disposed of on site or at approved waste sites.
For n-hexane:log Kow: 3.17-3.94BOD 5 if unstated: 2.21COD: 0.04ThOD: 3.52Environmental fate:Transport and Partitioning: The physical properties of n-hexane that affect its transport and partitioning inthe environment are: water solubility of 9.5 mg/L; log[Kow] (octanol/water partition coefficient), estimatedas 3.29; Henry’s law constant, 1.69 atm-m3 mol; vapor pressure, 150 mm Hg at 25 C; and log[Koc] in the rangeof 2.90 to 3.61. As with many alkanes, experimental methods for the estimation of the Koc parameter arelacking, so that estimates must be made based on theoretical considerations.
The dominant transport process from water is volatilization. Based on mathematical models the half-life for n-hexane in bodies of water with any degree of turbulent mixing (e.g., rivers) would be less than 3 hours. Forstanding bodies of water (e.g. small ponds), a half-life no longer than one week (6.8 days) is estimatedBased on the log octanol/water partition coefficient (i.e. log[Koc]) and the estimated log sorptioncoefficient (i.e. log[Koc]) n-hexane is not expected to become concentrated in biota. A calculatedbioconcentration factor (BCF) of 453 for a fathead minnow further suggests a low potential for n-hexane tobioconcentrate or bioaccumulate in trophic food chains.
In soil, the dominant transport mechanism for n-hexane present near the surface probably is volatilisation(based on its Henry’s law constant, water solubility, vapor pressure, and Koc). While its estimated Kocvalues suggest a moderate ability to sorb to soil particles, n-hexane has a density (0.6603 g/mL at 20 C)well below that of water and a very low water solubility of 9.5 mg/L. n-Hexane would, therefore, be viewed asa light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL), which would suggest a low potential for leaching into the lower soildepths since the n-hexane would tend to float on the top of the saturated zone of the water table. n-Hexane continued.
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Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
would generally stay near the soil surface and, if not appreciably sorbed into the soil matrix, would beexpected eventually to volatilise to the atmosphere. Exceptions would involve locations with shallowgroundwater tables where there were large spills of hexane products. In such cases, the n-hexane could spreadout to contaminant a large volume of soil materials.
Air: n-Hexane does not absorb ultraviolet (UV) light at 290 nm and is thus not expected to undergo directphotolysis reactions. The dominant tropospheric removal mechanism for n-hexane is generally regarded to bedecomposition by hydroxyl radicals. Calculations assuming typical hydroxyl radical concentrations suggest ahalf-life of approximately 2.9 days. While n-hexane can react with nitrogen oxides to produce ozoneprecursors under controlled laboratory conditions, the smog-producing potential of n-hexane is very lowcompared to that of other alkanes or chlorinated VOCs. Hydroxyl ion reactions in the upper troposphere,therefore, are probably the primary mechanisms for n-hexane degradation in the atmosphere. As with mostalkanes, n-hexane is resistant to hydrolysisWater: Although few data are available dealing explicitly with the biodegradation of n-hexane in water,neither hydrolysis nor biodegradation in surface waters appears to be rapid compared with volatilization. Insurface waters, as in the atmosphere, alkanes such as n-hexane would be resistant to hydrolysis.
Biodegradation is probably the most significant degradation mechanism in groundwater. The ability ofPseudomonas mendocina bacteria to metabolise n-hexane in laboratory microcosms simulating groundwaterconditions has been documented. Mixed bacterial cultures as well as pure cultures are documented as capableof metabolizing n-hexane under aerobic conditions. In general, linear alkanes (such as n-hexane) are viewedas the most readily biodegradable fractions in petroleum , particularly when oxygen is present in solution.
Once introduced into groundwater, n-hexane may be fairly persistent since its degradation by chemicalhydrolysis is slow and opportunities for biodegradation may be limited under anoxic conditions or wherenutrients such as nitrogen or phosphorus are in limited supply.
Sediment and Soil: The most important biodegradation processes involve the conversion of the n-hexane toprimary alcohols, aldehydes and, ultimately, into fatty acids. Similar processes are encountered with otherlight hydrocarbons such as heptane. In general, unless the n-hexane is buried at some depth within a soil orsediment, volatilisation is generally assumed to occur at a much more rapid rate than chemical or biochemicaldegradation processes. Once introduced into deeper sediments, n-hexane may be fairly persistent.
Ecotoxicity:Fish LC50 (96 h): Oncorhyncus mykiss 4.14 mg/l; Pimephales promelus 2.5 mg/l (flow through); Lepomismacrochirus 4.12 mg/lDaphnia EC50 (48 h): 3.87 mg/l.
Ecotoxicity
Ingredient
Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
■ - Recycle wherever possible.
- Consult manufacturer for recycling options or consult local or regional waste management authority for disposal if no suitable treatment or disposal facility can be identified.
- Dispose of by: burial in a land-fill specifically licenced to accept chemical and / or pharmaceutical wastes or Incineration in a licenced apparatus (after admixture with suitable combustible material).
- Decontaminate empty containers. Observe all label safeguards until containers are cleaned and destroyed.
Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
continued.
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Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION
HAZCHEM:
•3YE
ADG7:
Class or Division:
Name and Description: ADHESIVES containing flammable liquid Land Transport UNDG:
Class or division:
Shipping Name:ADHESIVES containing flammable liquid Air Transport IATA:
ICAO/IATA Class:
Maritime Transport IMDG:
IMDG Class:
Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION
REGULATIONS
Regulations for ingredients
acetone (CAS: 67-64-1) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia Customs (Prohibited Exports) Regulations 1958 - Schedule 9 Precursor substances - Part 2","Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous
Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Illicit Drug Reagents/Essential Chemicals - Category III","Australia Inventory
of Chemical Substances (AICS)","Australia National Pollutant Inventory","Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) -
Appendix E (Part 2)","Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) - Appendix F (Part 3)","Australia Standard for the Uniform
Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) - Schedule 5","FEMA Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) Flavoring Substances 23 - Examples of FEMA GRAS Substances
with Non-Flavor Functions","GESAMP/EHS Composite List - GESAMP Hazard Profiles","IMO IBC Code Chapter 18: List of products to which the Code does not apply",
"IMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Other Liquid Substances","International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Survey: Transparency List"
toluene (CAS: 108-88-3) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (AQUA/1 to 6 - non-pesticide anthropogenic
continued.
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organics)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Ambient environmental standards (Domestic water supply - organic compounds)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Aquatic habitat)","Australia - Australian Capital Territory - Environment Protection Regulation: Pollutants entering waterways taken to cause environmental harm (Domestic water supply quality)","Australia Customs (Prohibited Exports) Regulations 1958 - Schedule 9 Precursor substances - Part 2","Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Illicit Drug Reagents/Essential Chemicals - Category III","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","Australia National Pollutant Inventory","Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) - Appendix E (Part 2)","Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Medicines and Poisons (SUSMP) - Schedule 6","IMO IBC Code Chapter 17: Summary of minimum requirements","IMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Noxious Liquid Substances Carried in Bulk","IMO Provisional Categorization of Liquid Substances - List 3: (Trade-named) mixtures containing at least 99% by weight of components already assessed by IMO, presenting safety hazards","International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Agents Reviewed by the IARC Monographs","International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards Prohibited","WHO Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality - Guideline values for chemicals that are of health significance in drinking-water" n-hexane (CAS: 110-54-3) is found on the following regulatory lists;
"Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia National Pollutant
Inventory","IMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Other Liquid Substances"
No data for Trade Essentials - Sprayable Contact Adhesive (CW: 6092-93)
Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION
REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH GUIDELINES
■ Established occupational exposure limits frequently do not take into consideration reproductive end points
that are clearly below the thresholds for other toxic effects. Occupational reproductive guidelines (ORGs)
have been suggested as an additional standard. These have been established after a literature search for the
reproductive no-observed-adverse effect-level (NOAEL) and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL).
In addition the US EPA's procedures for risk assessment for hazard identification and dose-response
assessment as applied by NIOSH were used in the creation of such limits. Uncertainty factors (UFs) have also
been incorporated.
Ingredient
■ These exposure guidelines have been derived from a screening level of risk assessment and should not beconstrued as unequivocally safe limits. ORGS represent an 8-hour time-weighted average unless specifiedotherwise.
CR = Cancer Risk/10000; UF = Uncertainty factor:TLV believed to be adequate to protect reproductive health:LOD: Limit of detectionToxic endpoints have also been identified as:D = Developmental; R = Reproductive; TC = Transplacental carcinogenJankovic J., Drake F.: A Screening Method for Occupational ReproductiveAmerican Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 57: 641-649 (1996).
■ Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at: www.chemwatch.net/references.
■ The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering controls must be considered.
This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review orcriticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without writtenpermission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700. Issue Date: 24-Nov-2011Print Date: 24-Nov-2011 continued.
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Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION

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